Pentecost Sunday reminds us that God loves all of us for who we are. This story where the holy spirit grants everyone the ability to understand each other in their own language is amazing. God embraces everyone’s differences, God doesn’t make everyone speak a universal tongue but allows us to embrace each other in equal understanding.

Good morning everyone, thank you for giving me the opportunity to speak on this beautiful Pentecost Sunday.

Today I want to share with you all my experience during this pandemic as a teenager, and what Pentecost means to me. 

On my last day of school, March 13th, Friday the thirteenth, 79 days ago I had no idea my senior year was over. The day before at drama rehearsal we were prepping for our spring musical and hopes were high. The threat of COVID-19 was looming among my peers but no one knew just how big it would become. When I left the school building that day at lunch to head to my internship, I was shocked at the number of people not in the office. Our company had announced everyone could work from home so I got in my car and drove home for the last time.

I think back to that time now, how naive I was, and why I didn’t have a mask on. I wish more measures were put in place to flatten the curve earlier, but we shouldn’t dwell on the past. The news has been filled with stories of the class of 2020’s creative solutions to missing Prom and Graduation. I personally missed my junior prom so I will never get to go to one, but I’m glad everyone is staying safe. I have come to realize that these experiences are just moments in a hopefully long life I will get to have because I socially distanced. This pandemic has made me less attached to possessions and moments such as these because God has a plan for all of us. If the class of 2020 graduates college in 5 years instead of 4, at least we are “all in this together” as high school musical proclaims. So many people have stepped up online to try to make our senior year at home amazing, and this has really revealed the wonderful people I am surrounded with. I realize the only reason I miss prom is that I can’t be with my friends there, not because of the fancy dress or the limo, but the love we have for one another. 

Being in quarantine, the days tend to run together, but I’ve grown much closer to my family. My brother has moved back home from New York City and its like I’m back in elementary school again. This extended time together we may never have again, so we are making the most of it. Aside from the spring cleaning, and quarrels over leftovers, we are there for each other. 

Every joke about corona online I see, every viral video about people refusing to wear masks I get emotional because getting this virus is not a joke. I don’t know how people decided to gather in huge groups again- this hasn’t gone away. My family, unfortunately, suffered the loss of my grandmother Margaret, a native American from rural North Carolina who moved to DC during WWII and made a life for herself. This beautiful 97-year long life was taken by this virus. People cannot decide that our elderly are expendable for the economy but I’m praying for those in power to make the right decisions and keep everyone safe. 

The real villain in this situation is the virus, not having to wear masks or stay home, people need to remember the wonderful people who even if they took every precaution couldn’t survive.

The Washington Post wrote an article about my grandmothers life which made me almost cry, her story in the newspaper for everyone to see. Even if I didn’t get to see her in her final days, I can look at the cute photos of her from the fifties and remember a great life. 

Pentecost Sunday reminds us that God loves all of us for who we are. This story where the holy spirit grants everyone the ability to understand each other in their own language is amazing. God embraces everyone’s differences, God doesn’t make everyone speak a universal tongue but allows us to embrace each other in equal understanding. 

This virus has affected entire world, we are truly in this together. Countries have gathered to share their knowledge and try to make a vaccine. The story of Pentecost reminds me, that no matter how alienated someone may feel in their situation, our differences make us who we are. The world should not be divided in this issue, for God has a plan and we need to work together. We are living in a turning point of history, someday I will tell my children about the 2020 virus, murder hornets, and more but I’ll know that we cared for each other in our time of need. 

Thank you to everyone who prayed for my family, and for pastor Neill speaking at our graveside service properly socially distanced. Although everyone’s experience at this time is different, Pentecost reminds us that God loves us for who we are. 

Thank you.